Mud Creek Now Mud Point

May 23, 2017

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Punta Barro: Big Sur’s newest geographical feature (photo credit: Rock Knocker)

The Santa Lucia Mountains are very young. At just 5 million years old, they are still in the process of being born – punching upward out of the Pacific faster than the forces of wind, waves, rain, and gravity can wear them down. Their steep, unstable seaward wall, rising to over 5,000 feet at Cone Peak, is constantly eroding, sliding and collapsing into the sea.
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Big Sur Highway Mayhem Map

March 18, 2017

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The Highway has been mostly closed for over a month now, but sooner or later it will be business as usual again.

There’s been concern expressed recently about the safety of Highway One through Big Sur. Not concern about the inherent danger of a narrow, twisting road perched on the side of a cliff, but concern about new dangers created by congestion and overcrowding.
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Parks, Taxes & Fracking: Measures E, X, and Z Pass

November 10, 2016

While voters at the national level were rejecting the neoliberal consensus of the Democratic and Republican elites by hurling a human bomb into the White House, voters in Monterey County quietly banned fracking and voted to tax themselves to support parks and transportation projects.

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Garland Regional Park: The passage of Measure E ensures that popular parks, like Garland, will continue to be adequately funded.

Measure E

The Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District needed a 2/3 majority vote on Measure E to prevent an assessment on real property (amounting to about $25.00 per year on single family homes) from expiring. The Monterey Peninsula Taxpayers Association predictably opposed the Measure.

There was a time when the Taxpayers Association (formed in the 1960s to prevent a public takeover of the water system) carried enough clout that their opposition would likely have prevented the District from achieving the needed super majority. Not this time.

Peninsula residents overwhelmingly expressed their support for keeping the parks and wildlands managed by the District adequately funded and Measure E passed with a, more than comfortable, 71% of the vote.

Measure X

I’ve written before (in long and boring detail) about the difficulties of getting the 2/3 vote needed to pass a transportation sales tax measure and become a “self-help” county, but it looks like the Transportation Agency for Monterey County has finally succeeded (this was their fifth try) by a razor thin margin of 67.36%.

This result was made possible by getting the environmental community on board (mainly by including $20 million for a bike and pedestrian trail to be built on the former Ft. Ord), while otherwise making the measure car-centric enough to avoid opposition from the Hospitality Association and Farm Bureau (both of which threatened to oppose the Measure due to the trail funding but, in the end, did not).

Measure Z

Oil interests, led by Chevron, probably set some kind of Monterey County record by spending more than $5 million in their unsuccessful effort to defeat Measure Z. On a dollars-per-vote-gained basis, though, they will probably still fall short of the better than $217 per vote Cal Am spent in 2014 to prevent the Monterey Peninsula Water District from finding out whether public ownership of the water system would make economic sense.

In an even marginally sane and science-driven world, Monterey County’s extremely carbon intensive oil (dirtier even than the infamous Canadian tar sands) would have been taken out of production more than 20 years ago (the urgent need to radically reduce carbon emissions was internationally recognized in 1988, let’s not forget), so Measure Z, which allows current operations to continue, is hardly a radical measure. It is, in fact, little more than a first tentative step toward protecting our water and climate. But the planet’s most powerful and irresponsible industries do not suffer interference in their operations gladly.

With nearly 56% of voters in favor, in spite of opponents outspending proponents by better than 30 to 1, this was an extremely impressive victory. Hopefully, it is a victory that will inspire others to take similar grassroots level action. The prospects for leadership on climate issues at the national and international levels aren’t looking so good.


A Boring Post About Transportation Policy

April 24, 2016

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Traffic

If there’s one thing I’ve learned in eight years of blogging, it’s that if you want anyone to read your stuff, don’t write about transportation issues. My 2008 posts examining the Transportation Agency for Monterey County’s failed efforts to pass a transportation sales tax measure remain, by a considerable margin, the least popular pages on this site. Last month’s post about current water levels in South County reservoirs got more page views in a few days than transportation-related posts get in years. Read the rest of this entry »


Long Summer

August 31, 2013

With the last rainy season fizzling out in January, it seems like it’s been summer for about eight months now. Plenty of time to paddle, pedal, and roam around in the hills — which is why we haven’t been posting here much. Don’t worry, though. We promise to turn our jaundiced eye back to water and development issues again someday soon. Maybe when the rains begin to fall.

In the meantime, here’re a few clues as to what we’ve been up to …

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Trail near the summit of Cone Peak. Coast partially obscured by smoke from an escaped controlled burn on Ft. Hunter Liggett. Read the rest of this entry »


Blanco Rd. Safety Improvements: Sanity Prevails

December 6, 2011

Sharin’ the Road

In a decision that bodes well for the future of sane public policy in Monterey County, the Board of Supervisors this afternoon voted 4-1 to go ahead with the long-planned and (with the exception of the Farm Bureau’s recent tantrum) completely uncontroversial bicycle safety improvements to Blanco Rd. A big thanks to the many, many people who took time away from work to attend today’s meeting and speak out for common sense. Read the rest of this entry »


Farm Bureau Demands County do Nothing to Improve Safety for Bikes on Blanco Rd.: Why Does this Sound Familiar?

December 3, 2011

Cyclists in the Salinas Valley

People who commute or otherwise ride their bikes between Salinas, CSUMB, Marina and the Monterey Peninsula tend to take Blanco Rd. – just as many of the people who drive between Salinas and these locations do. The reason is obvious. It’s the easiest and most direct route. Read the rest of this entry »