Parks, Taxes & Fracking: Measures E, X, and Z Pass

November 10, 2016

While voters at the national level were rejecting the neoliberal consensus of the Democratic and Republican elites by hurling a human bomb into the White House, voters in Monterey County quietly banned fracking and voted to tax themselves to support parks and transportation projects.

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Garland Regional Park: The passage of Measure E ensures that popular parks, like Garland, will continue to be adequately funded.

Measure E

The Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District needed a 2/3 majority vote on Measure E to prevent an assessment on real property (amounting to about $25.00 per year on single family homes) from expiring. The Monterey Peninsula Taxpayers Association predictably opposed the Measure.

There was a time when the Taxpayers Association (formed in the 1960s to prevent a public takeover of the water system) carried enough clout that their opposition would likely have prevented the District from achieving the needed super majority. Not this time.

Peninsula residents overwhelmingly expressed their support for keeping the parks and wildlands managed by the District adequately funded and Measure E passed with a, more than comfortable, 71% of the vote.

Measure X

I’ve written before (in long and boring detail) about the difficulties of getting the 2/3 vote needed to pass a transportation sales tax measure and become a “self-help” county, but it looks like the Transportation Agency for Monterey County has finally succeeded (this was their fifth try) by a razor thin margin of 67.36%.

This result was made possible by getting the environmental community on board (mainly by including $20 million for a bike and pedestrian trail to be built on the former Ft. Ord), while otherwise making the measure car-centric enough to avoid opposition from the Hospitality Association and Farm Bureau (both of which threatened to oppose the Measure due to the trail funding but, in the end, did not).

Measure Z

Oil interests, led by Chevron, probably set some kind of Monterey County record by spending more than $5 million in their unsuccessful effort to defeat Measure Z. On a dollars-per-vote-gained basis, though, they will probably still fall short of the better than $217 per vote Cal Am spent in 2014 to prevent the Monterey Peninsula Water District from finding out whether public ownership of the water system would make economic sense.

In an even marginally sane and science-driven world, Monterey County’s extremely carbon intensive oil (dirtier even than the infamous Canadian tar sands) would have been taken out of production more than 20 years ago (the urgent need to radically reduce carbon emissions was internationally recognized in 1988, let’s not forget), so Measure Z, which allows current operations to continue, is hardly a radical measure. It is, in fact, little more than a first tentative step toward protecting our water and climate. But the planet’s most powerful and irresponsible industries do not suffer interference in their operations gladly.

With nearly 56% of voters in favor, in spite of opponents outspending proponents by better than 30 to 1, this was an extremely impressive victory. Hopefully, it is a victory that will inspire others to take similar grassroots level action. The prospects for leadership on climate issues at the national and international levels aren’t looking so good.